Nica Living!

We have crossed the border in to our third and final country, Nicaragua! Sadie’s passport has the first few of many stamps, and I can proudly say she is a well seasoned traveler! Long bus rides barely phase her, she gives her smile freely to strangers speaking in foreign languages and loves exploring all the nooks and crannies of each new “home” we find along the way.

As for the whole family, things have slowed way down. Nica is cheaper by far than the places we have already been, so it’s easy to say “oh, let’s just stay another day… or four”. We got in to San Juan Del Sur and had lucked in to reserving the best possible hostel, called Rositas. It was so perfect for families because the rooms were like apartments with bedrooms and kitchens and there was an awesome central patio and garden for Sadie to explore. Other families with kids were coming through, too, so there were lots of playmates. The town was great too, a tourist oasis with everything from street food to chic cafés and bars right on the beach. The sand and sunsets were pretty amazing as well. We stayed about eight days, doing not much more than eating, relaxing and taking pictures. Oh, and watching the SEAHAWKS crush the Super Bowl, of course! And before we left we picked up a shiny new handmade Nicaraguan ukulele for Dave so he can serenade us while the sun slips softly away on another beautiful day of our adventure.

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Six dollars for lobster!
Six dollars for lobster!

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Rositas patio
Rositas patio

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Super Bowl Sunday!
Super Bowl Sunday!

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Then it was on to Ometepe, an island formed in giant lake Nicaragua by two volcanos, much like our beloved Maui. One volcano is still active, spewing off steam and ash pretty frequently, while the other has been dormant so long that a peaceful lake has settled into its crater. In its duplicitous nature the island also had a windy side and a calm side, and we basically did the whole thing, spending two nights on a great, but windy beach with new friends we made along the way, then two nights on a remote point on the other side where our hostel doubled as an English school for local kids during the day, and finally two nights on a proper farm, called a finca, with the Samarita family eating food literally just picked out of the gardens and chilling with the pigs, cows and chickens. The family was really welcoming and of course loved Sadie to pieces! Dave took about a million great photos with his artistic eye, it was hard to choose which ones to post!

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Yummy!
Yummy!

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Samarita family
Samarita family

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Very good times!

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